History 5 Lesson 50

Electric Clock

Alexander Bain was born in Scotland in 1811, he was an apprentice to a clockmaker. Bain moved to London to sell services. He learned about electromagnetism. He invented the electric clock in 1840. Electricity kept the pendulum moving instead of weight. Electronic oscillators also used to replace pendulums. Synchronous clocks use Go-HZ power frequency. Crystal oscillators can be used to track time. They can be smaller, last longer, and more portable. Bain almost swindled out of his invention. Wheatstom’s attention was thwarted by Bain’s patent application. Parliament awarded Bain “damages”. Inventors after 1840 began developing different kinds of electric clocks. 

Stapler

Samuel Slocum was born in Rhode Island in 1792. Learned carpentry then moved to London to make pins. He invented a machine that manufactured pins. Invented first stapler in 1841. Staples bind multiple sheets of paper together. U-shaped staples are driven through and their ends bend. Staplers used in numerous environments. They can also be used in construction and in medical application. George McGill spent 20 years improving versions of the stapler models in the early in the 1900s. 

Blueprints

John Herchel was born in England in 1792. Published a work on scientific methodology. Escaped to South Africa for a time in 1833. Published drawings of plants. He invented the blueprinting process in 1842. Blueprints are drawings, making it fast and easy to make copies of drawings. Chemically coated paper exposed to eight. Preserved perspectives on copies. Difficult to make changes to blueprints. The cyanotype process was used for drawings copies from  the beginning.  botanists used the technique to form images of plants. Cheaper than hiring drafters to hand copy. Scientists used the process, delinded after the 1940s. 

Grain Elevator 

Joseph Dart was born in Connecticut in 1799. He sold fers to Indian travellers, then moved into grain trading in Buffalo.  He partnered with Robert Dunbar. The two built the first grain elevator in 1844. Grain elevators lift grain up and into a silo. Dart’s was steam powered. About 8 times faster than manual unlading. Quickly unloaded, stored, and dispensed grain. Includes scale for weighing grain. Darts’s elevator built along a river. Word-of-mouth spread, Dumbar built elevators all over the world. Still prominent and important facilities today.      

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